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Posts Tagged ‘Nag Hammadi’

“Who knows maybe God didn’t even make the serpent. Maybe the serpent was here first. Maybe the serpent created God.” – The Mother in THEY, a biblical tale of secret genders

 

I’ve noticed a surge of interest in the Gnostic Gospels. The Gnostic Gospels can help you think in new ways, critical for this time period. Consider that “gnosis” is the common Greek noun for “knowledge.” Perhaps, the reason the Gnostic Gospels are scorned is in the name: Gnostic (“knowing”). Apparently, it is heretical to know your own truth.

I’ve decided to post short excerpts of my book THEY, a biblical tale of secret genders (Adelaide Books) that were inspired by the Gnostic Gospels. When I came across a story of the serpent (who talks!) in the Gnostic Gospels, I was fascinated. So today I am going to bring you excerpts of my novel that were inspired by the serpent.

The Gnostic Gospels were discovered in Nag Hammadi, Egypt in 1945. There are some conflicting theories about when they were first written, but some historians say that they were written before the New Testament was written. The Gnostic Gospels are very different from Genesis in telling the story of how the human race was created.

The Gnostic Gospels were known throughout history – particularly in the Middle Ages – but were always banned by the Church.

Those who were known followers of the Gnostic Gospels were deemed as heretics and burned. Granted, in those days you could be burned at the stake for many things. But the last time I searched Twitter for the Gnostic Gospels – people were still saying to be careful of the Gnostic Gospels – because you could still be branded as a heretic.

So, I’m sharing these excerpts in the hope that you may also be inspired to think in new ways:

“I’ve read this story to you before, but today I want you to think about the serpent. You know what a serpent is, don’t you?”

“Yes, Mama. I’ve seen them in the desert. Some are poisonous, and some are friendly. I don’t touch them unless you say it is okay,” said Tamar. She picked up her stylus. She drew a squiggly line and looped it around in the shape of a serpent. It had a fat body and held its head up.

“That’s right,” said Mother. “And that’s a very good picture. But serpents usually have a forked tongue sticking out. This one has to stick out her tongue and hiss to get Eve’s attention.”

“Okay, Mama.” Tamar picked up her stylus and drew a forked tongue in the soft wax.

“That’s very good,” said the Mother. “Now when I read the story to you again, think about the story from the serpent’s point of view. Remember the serpent is also known as the Female Principal and the Instructor.”

“What is an Instructor and Female Prin–?” asked Tamar.

The Mother looked at Tamar as if suddenly realizing that she was speaking to a child. “Oh. What I mean is that the serpent has the wisdom of the goddess and is teaching the humans in the Garden how to live. Do you understand?” Tamar nodded and smiled. She really did understand.

“Now the serpent was more subtle than any other wild creature that the Lord God had made. What do think is meant by the phrase ‘more subtle?'”

Tamar looked up and gave the Mother a blank look.

“The person who wrote this might have meant that the serpent was more intelligent than the other creatures, less likely to bow down to God,” said the Mother. “Who knows maybe God didn’t even make the serpent. Maybe the serpent was here first. Maybe the serpent created God.”

Tamar looked at her mother and nodded. She was silent as she thought for a moment. “Maybe, the serpent wouldn’t let God tell her what to do.”

“Exactly,” said the Mother. She nodded her approval. “He said to the woman, Did God say You shall not eat of any tree of the garden?” The Mother stopped reading. She looked puzzled. Then she said, “I knew that there was something wrong with this sentence. The author refers to the serpent as He instead of She. Maybe it’s a typo.”

“Maybe the serpent was both,” said Tamar.

“Both? What do you mean?”

“Maybe the serpent was both male and female,” said Tamar.

“Oh, I see. I hadn’t thought of that. Maybe you have something there.”

The Mother smiled down at Tamar.

To learn more about my novel THEY, a biblical tale of secret genders (published by Adelaide Books New York/Lisbon), click here.

 

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One of my inspirations for my novel THEY, a biblical tale of secret genders (Adelaide Books — NY/ Lisbon) is the Gnostic Gospels.

The Gnostic Gospels were discovered in the Egyptian town of Nag Hammadi in 1945.  Originally written in Coptic, these texts date back to ancient times and give us an alternative glimpse into the Gospels that are written in the New Testament. They are so important that they are banned in some conventional religions.

In my book, that’s a good reason to read them.

Reading them led me to think of myself as a Gnostic – meaning one who has knowledge and who pursues knowledge – including mystical knowledge.

The first place where I heard the Gnostic Gospels was in the music composed and played on the harp by our friend Julia Haines.

Julia has a wonderful composition of Thunder Perfect Mind. 

Thunder Perfect Mind is one of the ancient texts of the Gnostic Gospels.

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I am inspired by the Gnostic Gospels in part because they let in the light.  In particular, they let in the light of the feminine.

As Julia says in her rendition of Thunder:

I am godless

I am Goddess

To learn more about Julia’s music, you can click the following link to her CD Baby Page that features HER Songs, Thunder: Perfect Mind and Odyssey.

  https://store.cdbaby.com/Artist/JuliaHHaines

To learn more about my novel THEY, a biblical tale of secret genders (published by Adelaide Books New York/Lisbon), click here.

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